As Seen On

WJLA-TV HOME, March, 2011

It’s a familiar sound to every new parent – one that can drive them wild.

The sound of a baby crying. Now an increasing number of sleep-deprived parents are turning to baby whisperers for help.  Infant sleep consultants create customized plans for parents and hold their hands through the process.

D.C. based sleep consultant Annika Brindley said business is booming.  

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MSN Health & Fitness, December, 2008

Sleepless Baby, Depressed Mom—Which Came First?
Helping moms help their babies get to sleep.

by Tina Adler for MSN Health & Fitness

Until recently, Diana Funk's blog, "Caffeinated," had the subtitle, "Because Maddie Lu Says, 'I Refuse to Snooze.'" Maddie Lu is Lulu, Diana's 2-year-old daughter. For Diana, Lulu's wakefulness was not just a minor annoyance. Diana is prone to depression, and "sleep deprivation adds to it," she said. She felt like her life was "falling apart because of Lulu's just horrible sleeping habits."


Washington Post, March, 2008

A Coach at the Crib And a Consultant at the Potty by Annys Shin

Maria Zimmitti didn't set out to become, in her words, the potty lady. The Georgetown psychologist fell into the role of toilet-training coach. She mastered potty training while working with children in an early-intervention program in the District in the late 1990s. About five years ago, she shared her techniques with a few groups of mothers. Word of Zimmitti's skills soon lit up local Internet discussion groups.
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Washington Parent, July, 2007

Good Luck and Goodnight
Coaching Your Child to Better Sleep Habits by Julie Kirtz Garrett

What is a good night’s sleep worth to a busy, sleep-deprived mom? Rockville mother, Elaine Sigman, paid $600, and she considers it a bargain. For that amount she could have supplied herself with a daily café latte for six months straight – enough caffeine to keep her perky all morning. Instead, Sigman hired a sleep coach to get her 2-year-old son to sleep through the night.
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The Washington Post, April 25, 2006; Page HE05

Teaching Kids to Sleep by Margaret Webb Pressler

When a child's sleep problems are entirely behavioral, nighttime can become a battle of wills in which the shortest person in the fight is usually the victor.
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